Second resident reading, Tuesday January 21

I asked the talented and witty John Berry to document our second resident reading, and he did a lovely job. Voilà:

Phil Palmedo

Phil Palmedo

Phil Palmedo

Phil Palmedo

Phil Palmedo, drawn by John G. Berry

Phil Palmedo, drawn by John G. Berry

Jenna

Jenna McGuiggan

Jenna McGuiggan drawn by John G. Berry

Jenna McGuiggan, drawn by John G. Berry

Liz Edelglass

Liz Edelglass

Liz Edelglass, drawn by John G. Berry

Liz Edelglass, drawn by John G. Berry

Catherine Despont

Catherine Despont

Catherine Despont, drawn by John G. Berry

Catherine Despont, drawn by John G. Berry

Gillian Devereux

Gillian Devereux

Gillian Devereux

Gillian Devereux

Gillian Devereux, drawn by John G. Berry

Gillian Devereux, drawn by John G. Berry

Char Wilkins

Char Wilkins

Char Wilkins

Char Wilkins

Char Wilkins, drawn by John G. Berry

Char Wilkins, drawn by John G. Berry

used for fortune telling and in certain games

I’m participating in a resident reading tonight, and a lot of people asked if I would be projecting images of the visual poetry I’ve been working on here. I immediately thought of pictures I’ve seen of Jessica reading her poems as they’re projected on a big screen behind her. I would like to be like Jessica.

But, since no other readers will be using a projector tonight, I decided to wait until the final Open Studios of the month to try and share some of my visual work. In the meantime, I promised to post some pictures of my daily Tarot card erasures here. (As always, you can click on a picture to enlarge it.)

tarot_010314

tarot_010614

tarot_011014

tarot_011514

tarot_011814

I am less interested in the fortune telling properties of Tarot cards than I am in their origin. I like the idea that a rich Italian aristocrat might have commissioned a hand-painted set of playing cards that included extra allegorical trump cards on a whim. tarot_noun I like to imagine a world where people play ordinary card games with Tarot decks. I also love seeing depictions/interpretations of Tarot cards in popular culture. For instance, a particular Tarot card plays a major role in the film The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones. You might not know this, because you are possibly an adult person who does not read large quantities of YA fiction and/or watch a lot of television and films whose target audiences are adolescent girls. But I watched City of Bones while I was knitting the other night, so I know all about it. Those cards were hand-painted, too. Everything comes full circle.

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Not the scene with the Tarot card.

More pictures, more clicking to enlarge

I have more

Several of the other residents, mostly visual artists and nonfiction writers, had questions about The Deletionist, how it works, and how often I use it to make it poems. (I can answer that last question by saying that I experiment with my deletionist button fairly often but find I only rarely get truly interesting results.)

I promised to share another “successful” erasure created by me and The Deletionist, an erasure of a digitally annotated version of “Eurydice” by H.D. You can read the full erasure here. I’ve also included an image of one of the screenshots below.

Eurydice_page 1

kiss, kiss, kindling

This morning the first batch of two week residents for January left VSC, and this afternoon the residents who will be here for the second two weeks of the month arrive. It was difficult to say goodbye to new friends, especially Amanda, Laurel, and Steph, who will finish her MFA at George Mason University (my alma mater) this semester. (I didn’t even attempt to say goodbye to Lee Ann. She just needs to stay in my life forever. Burlington and Boston are not that far apart.) In Maverick, we also lost Marie, Pam, and Lisa, so right now the studio feels empty and full of ghosts.

I wore my Camp Fox shirt to protect me from lonesomeness.

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Since everything here felt quiet and ghostly, I also worked a little on my private Jane Eyre project, and then I decided to try out my Deletionist button on the Project Gutenberg text of the novel. In this tiny post at The Millions, Nick Moran explains what the Deletionist is:

The Deletionist is a concise system for automatically producing an erasure poem from any Web page. It systematically removes text to uncover poems, discovering a network of poems called ‘the Worl’ within the World Wide Web.”

I took some screenshots of some of the most interesting early pages (click to enlarge):

Jane Eyre 1 2014-01-18

Jane Eyre 2 2014-01-18

Jane Eyre 3 2014-01-18

Jane Eyre 4 2014-01-18

Jane Eyre 5 2014-01-18

Jane Eyre 6 2014-01-18

Jane Eyre 7 2014-01-18

So far I really like the way these “deletionist-ed” pages have turned out. I have been listening to Nick Cave, and I think he agrees with me.